News

Stronger westerlies blow an ill wind for climate

Stronger westerly winds in the Southern Ocean could be the cause of a sudden rise in atmospheric CO2 in a period of less than 100 years about 16,000 years ago, according to a study published in Nature Communications. The westerly winds during that event strengthened as they contracted closer to Antarctica, leading …

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Global warming may be twice what climate models predict

Future global warming may eventually be twice as warm as projected by climate models under business-as-usual scenarios and even if the world meets the 2°C target sea levels may rise six metres or more, according to an international team of researchers from 17 countries. The findings published last week in Nature …

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ENSO Dynamics Workshop

 The Workshop has now been held. You can find a report on the two-day event, here.  You are cordially invited to join a discussion on ENSO dynamics on November 20/21, 2017, at University of New South Wales (Sydney), hosted by the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science, and the new ARC Centre of …

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Regional adaptions can cool heat extremes by up to 2-3°C

New research published today in Nature Geoscience has found that climate engineering that modifies the properties of the land surface in highly populated areas and agricultural areas over North America, Europe and Asia could reduce extreme temperatures there by up to 2-3°C. The modifications could include lightening buildings, roads and other infrastructure in high population …

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Climate change to expand impacts of El Nino/La Nina extremes

Australia, South America and Equatorial Africa are in the firing line for more extreme weather, as global warming looks set to increase the area of land affected by El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), better known as El Niño and La Niña events. ENSO events already have significant impacts on economies, affecting …

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Director’s report – December 2017

The heading of this newsletter, Endings and Beginnings, is particularly apt as I step into the role of Director of ARCCSS as it winds down and Andy Pitman moves across to Director of CLeX as it powers up. We also lose one of our key chief investigators in both centres, …

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Anil Deo visits Goddard Space Flight Centre, NASA

Anil Deo, a PhD student in the School of Earth Sciences at the University Of Melbourne mentored by Professor Kevin Walsh, recently spent two weeks at the Goddard Space Flight Centre (GSFC, NASA) to collaborate with Dr Stephen Munchak on an active research project that examines the representation of convective and stratiform …

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Record-breaking marine heatwave cooks Tasmania’s fisheries

Climate change was almost certainly responsible for a marine heatwave off Tasmania’s east coast in 2015/16 that lasted 251 days and at its greatest extent was seven times the size of Tasmania, according to a new study published today in Nature Communications. The marine heatwave reduced the productivity of Tasmanian salmon fisheries, …

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Stronger winds heat up West Antarctic ice melt

New research published today in Nature Climate Change has revealed how strengthening winds on the opposite side of Antarctica, up to 6000kms away, drive the high rate of ice melt along the West Antarctic Peninsula. Researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science found that the winds in East …

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Matthew England awarded Tinker-Muse Prize

The prestigious Tinker-Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica for 2017 has been awarded to chief investigator Professor Matthew England in recognition of his outstanding research, leadership and advocacy for Antarctic science. The US $100,000 prize, awarded by the Tinker Foundation and administered by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, is …

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